About Conall Boyle:
Hi. That's me, Conall Boyle, outside the Bouleoterion in the Agora, Athens. (ok old pic, but this is my website!) This was the Council Chamber, supreme authority for all Athenians. To become a Councillor you had to be selected by the kleroterion, which was a lottery machine. This, and not elections, is what they meant by 'Democracy'

After many years teaching Economics to Building and Surveying students at UCE - University of Central England,(now Birmingham City Univ.), I've now been 'retired' in South Wales for more than a decade. As well as the usual adorable grandchildren, travel, cycling, family history etcetera, I keep up my interest in Basic Income, the Housing Market, Land Value Taxation and Money Creation. (more on Housing, Money and Land )

But my main activity in 'retirement' was researching 'Who gets the prize: the case for random distribution in non-market allocation' at the Economics Department, Swansea University. M Phil 2006. Two books followed 'Gataker: The nature and Uses of Lotteries' in 2008 and 'Lotteries for Education' in 2010. Click on 'My Papers' link above to find out more about this simple yet revolutionary idea.

But these days I seem to be mostly editing and selling books and booklets for the Kenfig Society link out Kenfig Society
and doing my bit for walking and cycling as Sustrans Local Ranger (and area co-ordinator for most of Neath and Port Talbot) Sustrans link out
Conall Boyle: born 1942 in Dublin. Educated by Jesuits (Gonzaga) and Franciscans (Gormanston);
then at University College, Dublin degree in Mechanical Engineering (1964).
Emigrated to Birmingham UK to work for four years in production engineering at the Lucas car parts factories.
Then for 34 years, lecturing in Statistics and Economics at what was eventually called Birmingham City University.
B Sc Economics (London external 1972), M Sc in Industrial Statistics (Aston 1980), M Soc Sci (by thesis, Birmingham 1991) on 'Housebuilding Quality'.
Finally? 'Who gets the Prize: The case for random allocation in non-market allocation' M Phil 2006 Swansea University.
Books: 'Mastering Statistics with your Microcomputer' 1986; 'In the footsteps of the Gunpowder Plotters' 1994; 'The Nature and Uses of Lotteries' 2008; 'Lotteries for Education' 2010
..
THE KLEROTERIANS: In the middle picture (above) is a 'Kleroterion' a randomising device used by the ancient Athenians. On its left would have been a funnel which fed out black or white balls at random. One ball is shown in the picture on the right. Name tags (righthand picture) from a stack would then either be inserted in a slot in the Kleroterion (white ball) or rejected. In this way the Athenian citizens were selected for a year of service to their 'polis'.


Using the name THE KLEROTERIANS, I've set up a mailing list of people who are interested in the idea of sometimes letting random chance decide. If you'd like to join in the discussion, please email me at the address below.
What do you think? To add your comments please email on the link below. Thanks for visiting!


E-mail your comments